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Malaysia Plane Hidden With Electronic Weapon? 20 Hi-Tech EW Defense Passengers

By   /   March 12, 2014  /   No Comments

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Villagers near Marang, on Malaysia’s eastern coast, told police they heard a “loud and frightening noise” around 1.20am Saturday morning, according to Tom Phillips, a Telegraph correspondent in Kuala Lumpur.

Malaysia-Airline-crash

Alias Salleh, a 36-year-old truck driver told Malaysia’s The Sun Daily, he and friends had run towards the source of the noise, “but did not see anything unusual.”

“The noise sounded like “the fan of a jet engine,” Mr Salleh added.

“My friends and I heard the ringing noise for about two minutes,” said Mohd Yusri Mohd Yusof, a 34-year-old villager.

Four people in particular who boarded the missing Malaysian plane are being investigated, two for stolen passports and two other passport-related suspects. Those four suspects plus twenty people on board involved in cutting edge electric technology. some used for defense purposes, raise a question with this reporter about electronic weaponry hiding the plane.Economic Collapse

Added to the tragic mystery is why not one country checked databases for information about stolen passports used to board the Malaysia Airlines flight.

New electronic weapons allow jamming, blinding, deafening and more, so that a plane could possibly vanish from radar detection and security systems would not be activated. Basic radar Electronic Counter-Measure strategies used in electronic warfare (EW) are: 1) radar interference, 2) target modifications, and 3) changing electrical properties of air.

For example, a U.S. intelligence assessment described to The Daily Beast by current and former U.S. intelligence officials, concluded any Israeli attack on Iran would go far beyond fighter plane airstrikes and would likely deploy EW against Iran’s electric grid, Internet, cellphone network, and emergency frequencies for firemen and police officers.

“For example, Israel has developed a weapon capable of mimicking a maintenance cellphone signal that commands a cell network to “sleep,” effectively stopping transmissions, officials confirmed. The Israelis also have jammers capable of creating interference within Iran’s emergency frequencies for first responders.”

In a 2007, “the Syrian military got a taste of this warfare when Israeli planes ‘spoofed’ the country’s air-defense radars, at first making it appear that no jets were in the sky and then in an instant making the radar believe the sky was filled with hundreds of planes.”

Last year, it was announced that new stealth technology makes airplanes invisible not only to radar, it also renders them hidden to the human eye as well — “just like an invisibility cloak in a Hollywood sci-fi thriller,”

China had just touted its work on a “cloaking” technology using a hexagonal array of glass-like panels to bend light around an object, obscuring it from view, as though hidden by an invisibility cloak. Experts confirmed that the technology was legit — and not unlike American and European projects from the past few years.

“The general public … might not hear about how far the U.S. has really come, because it is and should remain classified,” firearms expert Chris Sajnog, a former Navy SEAL, told FoxNews.com. “Other countries are still playing catch-up — but they’re closing the gap.”

Military.com stated, “But while classified work progresses, several public projects from universities and military supply companies show just how real this futuristic technology is.”

“Major arms developers such as BAE Systems readily acknowledge work on this kind of technology, such as the Adaptiv program, which aims to hide armored vehicles.”

“The U.S. military is among many who have expressed interest in Adaptiv, which could be transferred to other platforms, such as ships and helicopters,” said Mike Sweeney, a spokesman for BAE.

On the other hand, some experts dispute these new technologies can work at all.
“Invisibility cloak is a poorly chosen term,” Thomas Way, associate professor of computing science at Villanova University, wrote to FoxNews.com in an email. “Invisible to what? We already have stealth aircraft that are invisible to radar (usually), but there is absolutely no way given our current understanding of physics that something could be made invisible to the naked eye… If that’s what they are claiming, it’s a hoax.”

In Electronic Warfare jargon, however, electronic countermeasure exists. ECM is an electrical or electronic device designed to trick or deceive radar, sonar or other detection systems, like infrared (IR) or lasers.

ECM can be used offensively and defensively to deny targeting information to an enemy.

The system can “make the real target appear to disappear or move about randomly. It is used effectively to protect aircraft from guided missiles.

“Most air forces use ECM to protect their aircraft from attack. It has also been deployed by military ships and recently on some advanced tanks to fool laser/IR guided missiles. It is frequently coupled with stealth advances so that the ECM systems have an easier job. Offensive ECM often takes the form of jamming. Defensive ECM includes using blip enhancement and jamming of missile terminal homers.”

Austin-based Freescale Semiconductor (NYSE:FSL) launched a major initiative dedicated to serving RF power needs of U.S. aerospace and defense (A&D) sector. It has a team of specialists dedicated to supporting defense customers.

Freescale confirmed yesterday that 20 of its employees were on Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, twelve from Malaysia and eight from China. The company’s key product solutions include those for electric vehicles, as this reporter highlighted yesterday:

“Freescale Semiconductor (NYSE:FSL) is a global leader in embedded processing solutions, providing industry leading products that are advancing the automotive, consumer, industrial and networking markets,” the company says on its website and in its statement today. ”… our technologies are the foundation for the innovations that make our world greener, safer, healthier and more connected.”

Freescale says its “key applications and end-markets include: automotive safety,hybrid and all-electric vehiclesnext generation wireless infrastructuresmart energy management, portable medical devices, consumer appliances and smart mobile devices. The company is based in Austin, Texas, and has design, research and development, manufacturing and sales operations around the world.

Freescale’s commercial products meet requirements of applications such as:

  • Battlefield communicationsEconomic collapse
  • Avionics
  • HF through L- and S-Band radar
  • Missile guidance
  • Electronic warfare
  • Identification, friend or foe (IFF)

 

Human rights regarding security and privacy, possibly terrorism

Evidence of terrorism and the human rights related to security and privacy mount regarding the plane that vanished from radar with 239 people on board Saturday, less than an hour after leaving Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, bound for Beijing. Family and friends are suffering and furstrated with the lack of answers and even clues.

“By late Sunday, the lack of answers — or even many clues — to the plane’s disappearance added to misery of family members left behind,: the New York Times reported. “With Malaysian officials refusing to release many details of their investigation and sometimes presenting conflicting information, the families and friends of victims became increasingly frustrated.”

Officials say fragments spotted in the ocean ealier in the day are not from where the plane last had contact are not plane debris.

While everyone who boarded the plane are being investigated, four are under particular investigation. Two had stolen passports to board the now vanished Malaysia plane. They bought their tickets with two other people who boarded the plane and are also targets of the investigation.

A Chinese national, whose passport number was listed on the passenger manifest, did not board the plane, is still in China and this individual’s passport was never stolen, China’s state media reported.

The stolen passport carriers and the other two suspects have increased officials’ suspicions that the event is one of terrorism, but officials stress that the event has not been declared a terrorist event.

Hishammuddin Hussein, who holds two ministerial positions, said that “the four names are with me,” but added that the investigation was focusing on “the entire passenger manifest.” Hussein also said investigators from the FBI have joined the probe.

Interpol said not one country checked its database for information about stolen passports used to board the Malaysia Airlines flight.

Officials had said what might have been parts of the missing Malaysia Airlines plane were spotted, but later they confirm that the debris is not part of the plane.

The Wall Street Journal tweets Sunday morning had indicated the fragments might be part of the plane, but Vietnamese officials had warned that it was too early to confirm the debris was from the plane.

Earlier, Malaysia’s air force chief told reporters that military radar indicated that the plane may have turned from its flight route before losing contact.

“There is a distinct possibility the airplane did a turn-back, deviating from the course,” Malaysian air force chief General Rodzali Daud said Sunday, citing radar data.

Malaysia Airlines (MAS) chief executive Ahmad Jauhari Yahya said the Boeing 777′s systems would have set off alarm bells.

“When there is an air turn-back, the pilot would be unable to proceed as planned,” he said, adding authorities were “quite puzzled” over the situation.

Sunday, air force chief Rodzali Daud did not say which direction the plane possibly took when it apparently went off route.

“We are trying to make sense of this,” he said at a media conference. “The military radar indicated that the aircraft may have made a turn back and in some parts, this was corroborated by civilian radar.”

Pilots are supposed to inform the airline and traffic control authorities if the plane does start to return, according to Malaysia Airlines Chief Executive Ahmad Jauhari Yahya.

“From what we have, there was no such distress signal or distress call per se, so we are equally puzzled,” he said.

Suspected fragments were located around 50 miles from southwest of Tho Chu Island, according to the Wall Street Journal tweets, but these have been found to be debris not from the plane.

The fragments were believed to be a composite inner door and a piece of the tail, Vietnam’s ministry of information and communication said in a posting on its website. They were located some 80 kilometers south-southwest of Tho Chu island.

A photograph of one fragment floating in the water was released, as seen above.

Flight MH370 had relayed no distress signal, indications of rough weather, or other signs of trouble. Malaysia’s national carrier and the Boeing 777-200 model used on the route are known for solid safety records.

Relatives of the missing passengers camped out at the main international airport in China’s capital, bemoaning lack of news Sunday.

Instead of the airline, a friend had contacted one of the loved ones.

“The airline company didn’t contact me, it was a friend,” a middle-aged woman surnamed Nan told reporters, holding back tears, after finding out her brother-in-law was on the flight.

“I can’t understand the airline company. They should have contacted the families first thing,” she said.

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source: beforeitsnews.com

www.patriotnetdaily.com

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